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Marian in Alvord Bay
Marian in Alvord Bay

Life Aboard the Nathaniel Palmer – Week 1

Week 5
31 July 2006


 

Part II


Section II
July 30, 2006 – Special Travel Bulletin

For the majority of the past 4 weeks, we have been in various areas of the Southern Ocean and Scotia Sea to collect samples for the research being done on board. This past weekend, we had to opportunity to experience more of the outdoors. Following is a weekend summary:

 

Friday: We stopped in Alvord Bay to look at the majestic mountains and surrounding glaciers. We took 45 minute Zodiac rides in the bay.

Ice castles in Alvord Bay
Ice castles in Alvord Bay

 

Saturday: We spent the day at Palmer Station. In 1965, the U.S. established a small biology facility, called Palmer Station, after Nathaniel B. Palmer.  Palmer was a sealer who explored the Peninsula in 1820. In 1970 the new station was completed at 64 degrees 46íS, 64 degrees 03í W. The station is built on solid rock and has two major buildings and three small ones.  During the winter the station is occupied by 15-20 people who run the station. The population increases to 44 persons during the summer when scientists arrive to conduct experiments.

Palmer Station
Palmer Station

The climate is milder at Palmer Station than at other Antarctic stations because of the maritime air mass. The average temperature in the summer is about 36 degrees and in the winter 14 degrees. The day we were at Palmer was slightly cloudy and the temperature was 22 degrees.

nlet at Palmer station
Inlet at Palmer station

Many people spent the day hiking the glacier and or doing some skiing. In the afternoon, the store opened so that all our loved ones could receive T-shirts that say Antarctica on them. In the evening we were treated to dinner by the residents of Palmer station. There was a science lecture after dinner followed by drinks and dancing.

Source

Sites: For more on Palmer Station, see the following links:

Polar Science Station: Pop Goes Antarctica

 

Across the waters
Across the waters

 

Sunday: We stopped at Port Lockroy (64 degrees 49S, 63 degrees. 30W). The French Antarctic Expedition of 1904 discovered Port Lockroy; . During the summer, this area has a Gentoo (penguin) colony. A few lucky students spotted a lone penguin. The Port Lockroy Harbour  is where the first British station was constructed in 1944. The original huts are intact and have been renovated by the UK Antarctic Heritage Trust.

Winter sun and blue sky - Port Lockroy
Winter sun and blue sky - Port Lockroy
whaling artifacts
stove and clothes dryer
Whaling artifacts - Port Lockroy Stove and clothes dryer - Port Lockroy
dining room
Dining room - Port Lockroy

 

It has been a welcome break to get our feet on land and to view some of the majestic scenery of the southern continent. Now itís back to collecting and processing water samples to continue tracking the elusive element.

 

Tower and mountain - Port Lockroy
Tower and mountain - Port Lockroy
The NBP waits for the return of passengers
The NBP waits for the return of passengers

 


pdf

National Science Foundation. 2004. United States Antarctic Program Participant Guide.Source: National Science Foundation. 2004. United States Antarctic Program Participant Guide.  Arlington, VA: National Science Foundation.

Source

Shirihai, H. 2002. A Complete Guide to Antarctic Wildlife. Degergy, Finland: Alula PressSource: Shirihai, H. 2002. A Complete Guide to Antarctic Wildlife. Degergy, Finland: Alula Press


Week 5
31 July 2006
Searching for the Elusive Element
Using Chemical Oceanography
Part I – Section I

Part I Section I Section I

Who works on the
Nathaniel B. Palmer?
Part I – Section II Part I Section II Section II July 30, 2006 –
Special Travel Bulletin




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NSF Office of Polar Programs, Antarctic Sciences Section
This special report was made possible by the NSF Office of Polar Programs, Antarctic Sciences Section, Award Nos. ANT04-44134 University of California-San Diego Scripps Institution of Oceanography (B. Gregory Mitchell, Farooq Azam, Katherine Barbeau, Sarah T. Gille, Osmund Holm-Hansen); ANT04-43403 University of Hawaii (Christopher I. Measures, Karen E. Selph); ANT04-44040 University of Massachusetts Boston (Meng Zhou); ANT04-43869 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (Matthew A. Charette),  for the study entitled "Collaborative Research: Plankton Community Structure and Iron Distribution in the Southern Drake Passage".