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Activities

The following activities can be integrated into themes or be used by themselves to bring improvement in targeted competencies. They are not necessarily meant to be used sequentially; rather read through the activities which address the skill you wish to cover, then choose the ones which best suit the needs and interests of your learners.

PERSONAL MANAGEMENT

SELF ESTEEM (PS)

PS1 Understand how one's self esteem affects performance.

 

ACTIVITY ONE (PS 1)

Objective: Students will understand the concept of self-esteem.

1. Individually, students answer the following questions on a piece of paper:

What does self-esteem mean to you?

Why is self-esteem important?

How do you know when someone has it?

How do you know when someone doesn't have it?

2. Students get into pairs and combine their answers on a third piece of paper.

3. The class creates a definition of self-esteem.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PS 1)

Objective: Students will recognize positive qualities in themselves.

1. Students review their definition of self-esteem.

2. Students divide a piece of paper into three sections.

3. In one section, students write down things that they like about themselves. In the second section, students write down compliments they have received from others. In the third section, students write down phrases that they can say to themselves in order to make themselves feel good.

4. Students share their papers in groups of three to six people.

5. Each group reports back to the whole class similarities and differences which existed among the members.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (PS 1)

Objective: Students will assess their self-esteem

1. Individually, students write down three sentences describing what they think people who have a healthy self-esteem act like, look like or talk like. For example: "People who feel good about themselves dress well." or "People who feel good about themselves give their opinion easily."

2. The class joins together and brainstorms a list of at least 20 items. The instructor writes them on the board and students copy them down neatly on paper. They skip a line between items.

3. Students rate themselves on a scale of 1-5 on each item (5 being the highest).

4. Students write one sentence following each item they rated four or five. The purpose of this sentence is to provide an example which proves that the student has high self-esteem in that area.

 

ACTIVITY FOUR (PS 1)

Objective: Students will create affirmations to help them cope when they feel low.

1. In small groups, students share things in their life that make them feel good and things that make them feel bad.

2. The instructor introduces the concept of affirmations. Individually, students create affirmations they can use when they feel low, and write them on a piece of paper. Several students volunteer to write their affirmations on the board.

3. On the count of three, all of the students shout out their affirmations.

 

ACTIVITY FIVE (PS 1)

Objective: Students will practice sticking up for themselves.

1. The instructor asks students if they have ever felt that certain people wanted to pull them back or make them feel bad, and why they think people would want to do that. Students respond.

2. A volunteer student goes to the board. Students call out phrases that were said to either make them or someone else feel bad. They are written on the board.

3. The instructor tells the students to pretend that s/he is a negative person who says things to them like the things that are written on the board. Students discuss various approaches to disagreeing or dealing with negative people.

4. The instructor puts on a mask and stands in front of the class, and begins to recite the negative phrases on the board. Individually, students stand up and respond to one of the phrases on the board as if it were being directed to him/her. For example, on the board "You are so sloppy" is written. The student responds, "I don't like it when you tell me that I am always sloppy. I'm not sloppy; I am carefree. I like myself the way I am. I would rather we didn't talk about my habits anymore. Let's talk about something else."

5. Students share what it felt like for them to stand up for themselves.

 

ACTIVITY SIX (PS 1)

Objective: Students will develop tools to help themselves when they feel low.

1. Students share what they do to help themselves feel better when they are feeling low.

2. Their ideas/strategies are written on the board.

3. The instructor passes out the "Picturing Success" handout.

4. The class reads through the handout together.

5. Individually, students write down the strategies they would be willing to try out to help themselves feel better when they feel low. (They use the list on the board and the strategies discussed in the handout.)

6. Students share the strategy they would be willing to try out and why they chose that particular strategy.

 

ACTIVITY SEVEN (PS 1)

Objective: Students will understand that self-esteem fluctuates.

This activity is done over a one month period of time.

1. Students are given a copy of a monthly calendar and are told to give their self-esteem a rating on a scale of 1-10 (10 being the best) at the same time everyday for a month.

2. After a month students analyze the chart and write down whether their self-esteem tended to follow a specific pattern. Was it better on some days than others? What activities tended to make self-esteem rise? Was there anything that made their self-esteem go down?

 

ACTIVITY EIGHT (PS 1)

Objective: Students will be able to determine how self-esteem affects a person's life.

1. Students are instructed to think about someone they know who has a high self-esteem and someone they know who has a low self-esteem.

2. Individually, students write two short paragraphs, one describing each person.

3. Students get into groups of four to six and discuss the following questions which are written on the board:

What characteristics does the person with the high self-esteem have?

What kinds of things typically happen in his/her life?

What about the person who seems to have a low self-esteem? What is s/he like?

What kinds of things typically happen in his/her life?

4. The instructor brings the group together and asks "What role does self-esteem play in people's lives?" A class discussion takes place.

5. Students write a paragraph describing a time when self-esteem has had a big impact in their life.

 

ACTIVITY NINE (PS 1)

Objective: Students will be able to assess another person's self-esteem.

1. Students call out the characteristics of someone who has a good self-esteem and they are written on the board.

2. The instructor passes out "Hank's Story".

3. Individually, the students read the story and answer the questions.

4. Students compare their answers in small groups.

5. The class as a whole shares the answers to the questions.

 

ACTIVITY TEN (PS 1)

Objective: Students will be able to share what they like most about themselves.

1. The instructor brings in materials to make collages (magazines, glue, scissors, magic markers, etc.) and shows the students a model of a collage.

2. The instructor writes the following prompt on the board: "What Do You Like About Yourself?"

3. Students create a collage using the prompt as the theme.

4. The collages are displayed in front of the class. The class gathers around the collages.

5. One by one, students share the significance of their collage.

 

ACTIVITY ELEVEN (PS 1)

Objective: Students will give and receive compliments.

This activity works well at the end of the quarter or other classroom cycle.

1. Everyone stands in a circle, and thinks about compliments that they could give to one another.

2. The instructor holds a ball of yarn. S/he holds the end piece, gives someone in the circle a compliment, and then throws the ball of yarn to that person .

3. That person holds on to a piece of the yarn, gives someone in the circle a compliment, and then throws the ball of yarn to that person. This continues until everyone has given someone a compliment and thrown the ball of yarn. (Make sure everyone holds onto a piece of the yarn before they throw the ball of yarn!)

4. At the end, everyone is bound together by a web of yarn. The instructor then says something fitting such as: "We are all bound together by our friendship", or "We have learned a lot from each other and will always remember what we've shared."

 

PS2 Learn from one's mistakes

ACTIVITY ONE (PS 2)

Objective: Students will be able to recognize alternatives to decisions they have made.

1. The instructor informs the students that they will be forming a decision wheel. Students stand up and form two circles, an inner circle and an outer circle and face each other. (One circle is therefore inside of another.)

2. The inner circle will stand still. When it's time to change partners the outer circle will move to the next person going clockwise.

3. Students are instructed to ask each other the following questions which are written on the board. After one person has completed his/her answer, the other can state what s/he would have done in that situation. They talk for approximately two minutes before changing partners.

Tell about a decision you made that led to success.

Tell about a decision that you made that led to a sacrifice.

Tell about a decision you made that caused you heartache.

Tell about a decision you made that lead to someone losing a job.

Tell about a decision you made that went against your parents.

Tell about a decision you made that you are facing now.

Tell about a decision you made that a supervisor might face with you as an employee.

Tell about a decision somebody made that changed the course of history.

Tell about a decision somebody made that you disagreed with.

Tell about a decision you made that you feel proud of.

4. Students choose two of the people they spoke with and write a short note to each of them. In the note they acknowledge the decision that the person made, and either offer suggestions on how that situation could have been handled differently, or else compliment the person on how well they dealt with the situation.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PS 2)

Objective: Students will be able to recognize the advantages and disadvantages within choices that they have made.

1. The students are asked to look at their accomplishments that they made over the last year and to think about a specific challenge that they faced in the process of reaching one of them. (For example, "I went back to school, but in order to do that I had to first find a baby-sitter to take care of my son. Finding a baby-sitter was the challenge I had to face in order to go back to school.").

2. Each student writes his/her accomplishment and challenge on a piece of paper.

3. Students pair up and interview each other. They ask each other the following questions:

What was your accomplishment?

What was the challenge in your path?

How long did it take you to reach your accomplishment?

What support did you have?

What feelings did you have afterward?

How do you feel about your accomplishment now?

What is your current goal?

4. Students share something interesting that they learned about their partners with the whole class.

5. Each student writes a sequential paragraph relaying the process s/he went through to reach his/her accomplishment.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (PS 2)

Objective: Students will recognize individuals in history who have had to overcome obstacles in order to succeed.

1. Students brainstorm a list of famous people who faced major obstacles in their lives. The names are written on the board with the obstacle written next to them. The instructor can contribute to the list. (For example: Malcolm X...illiteracy, Helen Keller...deaf and blind, Tina Turner...abuse.)

3. Students individually choose someone they would like to learn more about.

3. Students go to the library and check out a book on that person.

4. Students read about that person and then give oral presentations on what they learned in front of the class. In the presentation they also see if they can relate the person's obstacles to situations they have faced in their own lives.

5. Students write a report where they discuss the person they read about and what they have in common with him/her.

 

ACTIVITY FOUR (PS 2)

Objective: Students will recognize that they have learned from the poor decisions they have made and that they no longer need to feel ashamed of those decisions today.

1. The instructor shares a poor decision s/he made in the past and how s/he is affected by it today. Students discuss examples of poor decisions people have made and the effects those decisions have had on the people's lives.

2. Privately, students write down a poor decision they made on a piece of paper and how that decision affected their lives. The instructor tells the students that most everyone has made poor decisions and done unwise things in their lives.

3. The instructor asks the students how people can get rid of the pain and regret they feel today caused by things that happened in their past. Students respond.

4. The instructor starts a fire in a can (if possible) and the students crumple up their paper and then burn it. (If it is impossible to have a fire, have the students cut up their writing into as many pieces as they can, and bury the pieces in a bucket of dirt.)

5. The instructor tells the students that the poor effects of their decisions are behind them now forever and now all that remains is the wisdom they have learned from those experiences. Students write in their journal using the following statement as a prompt: "What I've Learned From My Past."

 

PS4 State personal needs clearly and assertively

ACTIVITY ONE (PS 4)

Objective: Students will be able to express their skills in front of others.

1. The instructor leads the class in a discussion on learning new skills. The following prompts may be used:

When was the last time you had to learn a new skill?

How do you feel at first when you find out that you have to learn something new?

2. Each student is asked to get up in front of the class and talk about a time when s/he learned a new skill. Students have a few minutes to gather their thoughts. They are instructed to talk for one or two minutes responding to a few or all of following questions which are written on the board:

What was this new skill?

Why was it necessary for you to learn it?

How were you feeling at this time?

What was the challenge in learning the new skill?

How has this skill helped you in your life?

How could knowing that skill help you on the job?

What advice can you give to people learning something new?

3. The instructor mentions to the class that as they listen to others they can learn valuable insights that will help them in their own lives. The class applauds after each person's speech.

4. The class discusses the following question: "How can you transfer the fun, everyday skills you have to skills you need on the job?

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PS 4)

Objective: Students will be able to be assertive in tough situations.

1. The instructor tells the students a story about someone s/he had difficulty getting along with.

2. Students call out personality characteristics that they find difficult to get along with and they are written on the board (bossy, nagging, indecisive, etc).

3. The instructor asks a volunteer student to join him/her in front of the class. The student chooses one of the characteristics from the board. The instructor acts out a scene depicting that characteristic. The student reacts.

4. Other students comment on the instructor's acting and the student's reactions.

5. The instructor asks why it is sometimes difficult to get along with others. Students respond.

6. The instructor passes out "Difficult People".

7. In small groups, students read through the handout and decide on the best way of handling each personality type.

8. Students select one of those personality types and create a role-play where that personality is handled effectively.

9. Students read through "Getting Along With Difficult People" and underline the information which they find to be of value.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (PS 4)

Objective: Students will be able to develop strategies enabling them to speak comfortably in front of groups.

1. Students choose a subject that interests them. (The instructor can provide a broad range of categories such as: "Employment", "Family Life", "Hobbies" to assist in getting students started.)

2. The students follow these guidelines in order to prepare a talk on the topic of their choice:

Say something interesting about your subject to get the listener's attention.

State your topic.

State your ideas/opinions.

Give a conclusion.

3. Students pair up and give their talk to each other without being interrupted.

4. Next, students get into groups of four-six and take turns presenting their talks.

5. Finally, each student gives his/her talk in front of the whole class.

6. The class discusses how their feelings changed from talking to one person, to talking to a few people, to talking to the whole class.

7. Students create a handout entitled "Speaking Comfortably In Front Of Others." The students are told that the first handout they create will be a draft and that they will rewrite the handout after learning additional information. The following instructions are then written on the board: Divide your handout into three sections. The first section is titled, "Speaking To One Person." The next section is titled, "Speaking To A Small Group." The last section is titled, "Speaking In Front Of a Large Audience." Under each section be sure to cover the following three points:

How people will likely feel in each communication situation. ("Most people in this situation feel....")

Mistakes people commonly make in each communication situation. (Often people make mistakes in this situation by....)

Pointers to help them to succeed in each situation. (When you're in this speaking situation you should be sure to....)

8. Each group shares their handout with the whole class. Students add any information they hear that they like to their existing handout.

9. Groups redo their handout in order to incorporate the new ideas.

10. The instructor collects the handouts and creates a master handout to give to the students. The class can decide what to do with the handout.

 

PG2 Identify attainable and realistic long term needs that motivate personal growth

ACTIVITY ONE (PG 2)

Objective: Students will be able to identify their long term goals.

1. The instructor discusses his/her goals in front of the class answering the following points which are written on the board:

What the goal is.

Why they would like to achieve that goal.

How achieving that goal would affect their life.

What or who supports their goal.

What is a possible obstacle to their goal.

What the step by step process is to achieving their goal.

2. The students are asked to talk about a goal they have in front of the class. To help them organize their thinking, they can refer to the items written on the board.

3. Students take turns speaking in front of the class.

4. Each student creates a timeline showing what they will do sequentially in order to achieve his/ her goal.

5. Students get together with others in class who have similar interests and share his/her time lines.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PG 2)

Objective: Students will be able to set goals

This is a creative visualization exercise.

1. The instructor asks the students to close their eyes and reflect on their lives at this moment in time. They begin by taking three deep breaths.

2. The instructor speaks slowly in a calm manner and asks the students the following questions, giving them sufficient time to reflect on each one. (S/he may wish to play calming music in the background.)

How are things going for you at this moment in your life, this day of your life, this hour?

If you were to describe your life in one or two words, what would they be?

How would you like your life to be different ?

If you could change one area of your life, which area would it be?

What could you do to make this happen?

What would you like your life to be like a year from now?

What area of your life would you like to change the most over the next year?

How can you imagine your life changing?

Now focus on the future.

One year is actually just 12 months away, and they will fly by in the wink of an eye. · Imagine it's (put date here, one year into the future).

Where are you living? What are you doing? Who are you with?

What changes have occurred?

How are you feeling?

3. Upon completion, students write about their experience with the visualization and also answer the question, "What are some of your short term goals?" "What are some of your long term goals?"

4. Students share their writing in small groups.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (PG 2)

Objective: Students will recognize long term goals they have.

1. Students discuss the following ideas in small groups:

Do you believe in fate, that certain things are destined to be in your life?

Do you think that you have to really work hard for everything that comes your way?

How do you think your life is going to be 10 years from now?

2. Students share the highlights of their discussion.

3. The instructor asks the students to close their eyes and reads the following script slowly:

Let's go on a voyage into the future. Take three deep breaths and blow them out slowly...again three more..one..two..three..now imagine yourself standing in the middle of a huge field of tall grass. It is sunny outside. There is sunlight all around. You're flooded with sunlight. You can hear the chirp of small birds and the sounds of a nearby stream. You feel the warmth of the sun and you feel comfortable. It is (say date 10 years into the future). See yourself 10 years from now. How do you look? How do you feel? What are you doing? How healthy are you? How peaceful? What have you accomplished in your life? Relax and focus on every detail....What about your friends and family? Who are you close to? Who have you said good-bye to? How are you doing financially? Did your dreams come true? How are you feeling in this field of light?

4. Students write about their experience with the visualization and write down any long range goals that they feel they need to set for themselves at this point in time.

5. Students share their experiences and/or their goals with the class.

 

ACTIVITY FOUR (PG 2)

Objective: Students will recognize that present day actions affect long range personal growth.

1. The instructor writes down the following quote on the board and students give their "gut" reactions to it.

"We are creating our future every moment, but most of us don't realize it. Most of us watch our birthdays tick by hoping that our lives will change by some stroke of luck. Many of us don't realize that the power to change our lives lies within us and us alone. Don't wait for the world to change, you change."

2. Students think about typical life outcomes that they've seen in the people around them. They choose two or three outcomes and write each of them on a 3"X5" card (they only need to write the verbs). For example: "Owns a coffee shop," "Has a drinking problem," "Has four kids and lives on public assistance," "Has a great job at the phone company."

3. The instructor takes all of the cards and puts them in a pile.

4. Students take turns drawing a card with an outcome.They talk about what they would have to start doing from this day forward in their lives in order to secure or change that outcome in their future. For example, if a student draws a card saying, "Has a great secretarial job" s/he might say, "I would have to learn how to use a computer and take some college classes in office procedures."

5. Students write down in their journal two or three goals that they have and what they need to start doing now in order to make those goals a reality.

 

ACTIVITY FIVE (PG 2)

Objective: Students will be able to identify attainable and realistic long term job needs that motivate personal growth.

1. The instructor writes down the goals from the "Goals" handout on 3" x 5" cards (one goal per card).

2. The students write down 1-3 of their personal employment goals on 3" x 5" cards (one goal per card).

3. The instructor puts all the goals in a box or hat and has each student pick one out. They are told that their fate is decided and that they will have to live with that situation for the next five years.

4. The students are given a list of questions to answer. (See Handout- "Goals Worksheet.")

5. The students answer the questions individually.

6. Students share how they feel about "their" goals with the class.

7. The instructor divides the remainder of the cards among the students. The class breaks into small groups. The students read their cards aloud and say why or why not they would like that job.

8. Students share what kind of job they would really like to have.

9. Students research the job, (i.e., educational requirements, working conditions, availability of jobs now and in the future).

 

ACTIVITY SIX (PG 2)

Objective: Students will identify people around them who support their goals and learn a technique for dealing with people who don't.

1. Students write down one goal on the top of one piece of paper. They may wish to do this for a few of their goals, thus they will need several pieces of paper.

2. Students divide the paper in half lengthwise. On one side they write "Supportive Statements" and on the other side they write "Unsupportive Statements"

3. On the appropriate side, students write down in quotes things that people say to them that either inspire them toward their goals or hold them back from achieving their goals.

4. The instructor brings up the concept of the "Human Bank Account." (Some people around us add to our feeling of self worth. Other people take away from our feeling of self worth.) Students discuss this concept.

5. Students write a short letter to the voices that "hold them back" in order to deflect their negativity. For example, "Dear xxxx, No matter what you say or do I am still a positive, strong and capable person."

6. Students volunteer to read their letters aloud.

 

ACTIVITY SEVEN (PG 2)

Objective: Students will analyze reasons leading to someone having "bad luck"

1. In pairs students discuss the following:

How much control do people have over how their life turns out?

What does it mean to you to have your life "turn out"?

What kinds of things can you do to make sure your life turns out?

2. The teacher hands out "The Rodney Young" story.

3. Students read the story individually.

4. The class reads the story together.

5. In small groups students see if they can reach consensus on the ranking sheet.

6. The class shares their answers and then discusses two more questions: "What control did Rodney have over his destiny?" "What other alternatives are/were open to Rodney?"

 

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT CAREER PREPARATION (PP)

PP2 Prepare job applications, resumes, and letters of application

ACTIVITY ONE (PP 2)

Objective: Students will understand the components of a job application.

1. Students get into small groups and the instructor passes out an equal number of varied job applications. (Each person receives a job application.)

2. Students work together answering the three questions written on the board:

What do these applications all have in common?

What questions are easy to answer?

What questions are difficult to answer?

3. Each group shares their responses and the class creates a list of questions that are difficult to them to answer on the applications.

4. The instructor teaches the class how to answer those questions correctly.

5. Students each get a 3"x5" card. On it they write all of the important information they would need to fill out any job application (dates of past employment, phone numbers of past employers, etc.). Or, information is formatted on computer for wallet-size cards. An information card for each student is printed and laminated.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PP 2)

Objective: Students will be able to fill out a job application correctly.

1. Students share rules they've heard concerning filling out job applications. The instructor passes out, "Guidelines to Successful Applications."

2. The instructor reads through each guideline, stopping after each one to comment and ask for student comment.

3. Students fill out a job application.

4. Students get into pairs. They read each others application and paraphrase the information. For example, "I see that you worked at XYZ restaurant from 1987-1992."

5. If the information was unclear in parts, and/or didn't meet the guidelines, the students redo their application. If the application was clear and correct, they hand the application in to be checked by the instructor.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (PP 2)

Objective: Students will be able to prepare job applications

1. Students are given a sample job application to fill out. (See Handout-"Sample Application for Employment.") The application contains someinappropriate or illegal questions but the students are not informed of that at this stage of the exercise.

2. After filling out the application, the students are asked to circle the questions that they think are illegal.

3. The instructor leads the class in a discussion about their answers.

4. The correct answers are given and also discussed.(See Handout "Application Questions.")

Note: The following questions are inappropriate or illegal:

1. What is your marital status?

2. Mr., Mrs., Miss?

3. What is your maiden name?

4. What is your date of birth or age?

5. What is your gender?

6. Are you a U. S. citizen?

7. What is your height and weight?

8. Who is your spouse's employer?

9. What is the lowest salary that you would accept?

10. What are your childrens' ages?

11. What is your religion?

 

ACTIVITY FOUR (PP 2)

Objective: Students will understand the components of a resume.

1. Students get into small groups and the instructor passes out an equal number of varied resumes. (Each person receives a resume.)

2. Students work together answering the three questions written on the board:

What do these resumes all have in common?

What information is easy to put on a resume?

What information is more challenging to put on a resume?

3. Each group shares their responses and together decide which components of a resume are most difficult to create. (Likely it will be describing past employment.)

4. The instructor passes out "Describing You." Students determine what all of the job descriptions have in common.

5. Students create a resume using one of the in class resumes as a model.

 

PP4 Prepare for and participate in a job interview

ACTIVITY ONE (PP 4)

Objective: Students will be able to identify appropriate and inappropriate job interviewing behavior.

1. Students call out words that come to their mind when they think of interviewing for a job.

2. Students read the handout, "The Job Interview" and rate the situations using + (plus) or - (minus).

3. Students write about a job interviewing experience they had and identify things that went well in it and things they had trouble with.

4. The instructor divides the board in two. On one side s/he writes "Winning Interview." On the other side s/he writes "Losing Interview." Students generate behaviors that fit into each category.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PP 4)

Objective: Students will be able to assess their own interviewing ability.

1. The instructor asks students to recall the winning interviewing behavior that was generated earlier and writes it on the board.

2. The instructor gives out and goes over the "Interview Evaluation" handout, leads discussion on list, and has students assess their interviewing skills.

3. Students summarize their self evaluation in pairs or in small groups. They indicate the interviewing skills they would like to work on the most, and those they feel the most comfortable with.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (PP 4)

Objective: Students will understand the steps involved in the interviewing process.

1. The instructor writes the numbers 1-6 on the board going from top to bottom.

2. The instructor tells the students that there are predictable steps that occur during an interview which begin the minute a person first walks in the door and end when s/he leaves.

3. The instructor asks the students to help him/her define what those steps are.

4. When the students get stuck or complete the activity, the instructor passes out the "Steps To Interviewing" handout.

5. The class reads through the steps.

6. Students turn over the paper and with a partner see if they can recall the six steps on the back side of the paper.

7. The class discusses the helpfulness of this information.

 

ACTIVITY FOUR (PP 4)

Objective: The students will understand common interview questions and develop answers to those questions.

1. Students share questions that they have been asked in an interview. The instructor writes them on the board.

2. The instructor passes out the handout, "Common Interview Questions."

3. The instructor reminds students to answer the questions in complete sentences and models complete answers vs. incomplete answers to several of the questions.

(A complete answer not only means answering the question in a complete sentence. A complete answer also means offering proof by means of an example that shows that you can do the skill that you say you can do.) For example:

Question: "Do you prefer working by yourself or with others?'

Answer: "I can work alone, but I prefer working with others. At my last job we worked on teams. We regularly discussed each other's work and checked each others work at the end of every shift. I felt good about understanding how what I did fit into the whole picture. Because we worked on teams. I knew that what I did made a difference in other people's work and helped to make the company successful."

4. Students answer six to eight of the questions in writing.

5. The students get into groups and compare their answers. They may wish to change some of their answers.

6. The instructor calls on students to share their answers with the class.

7. Students get into pairs and take turns asking each other the interview questions.

 

ACTIVITY FIVE (PP 4)

Objective: Students will develop strategies for answering tough interview questions.

1. Students share questions they've been asked at an interview which were difficult for them to answer. The instructor writes them on the board.

2. The instructor passes out the handout, "Answering Tough Questions."

3. Students individually read through the pointers.

4. The instructor reads each pointer, stopping after each one to comment and ask for student comment.

5. Students practice asking each other the hard to answer interview questions.

 

ACTIVITY SIX (PP 4)

Objective: Students will be able to assess another's interviewing ability.

1. The instructor gives out another copy of the "Interview Evaluation" handout and tells the students s/he wants them to assess his/her interviewing ability.

2. The instructor asks a student to ask him/her a few interview questions.

3. The instructor answers the interview questions. S/he answers some them very well, some fairly well and others poorly.

4. Students assess the instructor's interviewing ability.

5. The instructor models another interview. This time performing differently in different areas. Students again assess the instructor's performance.

6. The instructor asks the students how to answer specific interview questions and how to act in different stages of the interview.

 

ACTIVITY SEVEN (PP 4)

Objective: Students will be able to interview successfully.

1. Students choose what kind of job they want to interview for and write down 3 or 4 questions that they would feel comfortable being asked. (They must be able to offer proof of their skills by example in their answers.)

2. Students choose the areas they wish to be assessed on by the class, by a peer or by the instructor (see "Interview Evaluation" Handout ).

3. The students pair up. One student asks another the interview questions s/he chose. They then switch roles.

4. Students receive feedback from each other after they complete their interview.

 

ACTIVITY EIGHT (PP 4)

Objective: Students will be able to go through the interview process with a peer.

1. Individually, students determine a job they would like to be interviewed for.

2. Each student completes an application form.

3. Students get into groups of three. Two students at a time pair up and interview each other using the common interview questions and the completed application form. They receive feedback from the third person who uses the "Interview Evaluation."

 

ACTIVITY NINE (PP 4)

Objective: Students will participate in an interview with an employer. (May be a mock interview or a real interview.)

The instructor has met with several employers or other people and has generated a list of people willing to interview students.

1. The instructor introduces the people s/he has that are willing to interview the students. (By name and job; the people are not necessarily there.)

2. The students choose who they would like to meet with.

3. The student is given a number to call in order to set up an interview with someone. (This person expects him/her to call.)

4. The student dresses appropriately and participates in the interview.

5. The interviewer offers feedback on the student's performance, and lets the student know whether or not s/he would have been hired and why.

 

PP6 Identify appropriate behavior and attitudes for keeping a job, i.e. punctuality, respect for others, good grooming, self-control.

ACTIVITY ONE (PP 6)

Objective: Students will be able to create a list of appropriate behaviors and attitudes for keeping a job.

1. Students think about their work history and share with the class what they liked about a particular job.

2. The instructor asks the students how they would have liked being a supervisor at that job, and what kinds of expectations they would have had of their employees. Students respond.

3. The instructor passes out the handout "You Are The Boss."

4. Students individually fill out the handout.

5. In groups of four to six, students compare their answers and come up with a list of appropriate behaviors and attitudes for keeping a job.

6. One group writes their list neatly on the blackboard.

7. Groups take turns coming up to the board and adding on to the list.

8. Once the final list is created, students copy it into their notebooks for future reference.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PP 6)

Objective: Students will find solutions to common work attitude problems.

1. Students make two lines facing each other. The instructor writes the following discussion points on the board:

Think of someone you know who has/had problems at work. What did s/he do or say?

What do you like least about your job?

What kinds of things do others do at work that get on your nerves?

2. The pairs start talking. After a few minutes they change partners. This is done by one line moving while the other line stands in the same place.

3. Students stop their discussion. They sit down in groups of four to six.

4. The instructor passes out the handout, "What's Going On?"

5. In their groups, students read the scenarios. They discuss reasons for and solutions to the characters' actions at work.

6. The instructor reads each scenario and asks the groups for their ideas.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (PP 6)

Objective: Students will be able to assess their grooming habits and make goals for improving their grooming.

1. The instructor divides the board into two. On one side s/he writes "Careful." On the other side s/he writes "Sloppy."

2. The instructor asks the students, "When you want to look your best what are some things you make sure that you do? (For example, use deodorant, comb your hair.) Students call out their responses and they are recorded on the board under the "Careful" heading.

3. The instructor moves toward the "Sloppy" heading and asks the students, "When you are being lazy, what grooming habits do you neglect doing? Students share their responses and the instructor writes what they say.

4. The instructor passes out the handout, "Assess Your Style."

5. Students fill out the handout.

6. One or two students can volunteer their responses to any particular item of interest.

7. The students write down at least one goal they can make for themselves in regards to their appearance.

 

PP7 Understand the need to handle multiple responsibilities, including the need to balance family and work lives

ACTIVITY ONE (PP 7)

Objective: Students will be able to identify and their values.

1. The instructor leads the class in a discussion of values. S/he asks:

What are values?

Where do people get their values?

Are some values better than others?

2. The instructor passes out, "Values Clarification" handout. Students individually fill out the handout.

3. The class shares their answers. A discussion follows.

4. Individually, students list their personal values in order of how much time they devote to each.

5. Students write a paragraph using the following as a prompt:; "The way I balance my activities does/does not follow my values."

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PP 7)

Objective: Students will be able to assess how they spend their time.

1. The instructor divides the board into two. On one side s/he writes "Wasting Time," and on the other s/he writes, " Using Time Wisely."

2. Students call out examples from their lives for each side and they are written on the board.

3. Each student make a pie chart divided up into sections to show proportionately how s/he spends his/her time. (The instructor may need to show the students a sample pie chart taken from his/her life.)

4. Students get into small groups and take turns sharing their pie charts. They ask each other the following questions which are written on the board:

When do you use your time most wisely?

Do you consider your life to be balanced?

Do you waste time?

Is there anything you'd like to spend more time doing?

Is there anything you wish you could spend less time doing?

 

ACTIVITY THREE (PP 7)

Objective: Students will have an understanding of good time management.

1. The instructor places a marker on one side of the room labeled, "Time Wasting." On the other side of the room s/he places a marker labeled, "Time Saving."

2. Students arrange themselves along the continuum. Those who manage their time well stand next to "Time Saving." Those who waste a lot of time stand next to "Time Wasting". Most people stand somewhere in between.

3. Students ask the person next to them for examples from his/her life to prove how well s/he manages time or wastes time. Students rearrange themselves if necessary.

4. Students sit down. The instructor passes out the "Time Management Assessment" form.

5. Students fill out the form.

6. Students discuss the results in small groups. They answer the following questions:

Which statements can you relate to?

Do you agree or disagree with the score you got and its interpretation?

 

ACTIVITY FOUR (PP 7)

Objective: Students will be able to organize their time using a time log.

1. The instructor gives a sequential description of his/her daily schedule.

2. The instructor asks the students how they keep track of their daily activities. A discussion takes place.

3. The instructor passes out a copy of the "Time Log" form to each student.

4. Students fill out their time log (for as many days as they wish, up to one week).

5. Students get into groups of four and see if they can schedule three times to meet with each other over the next week. They are told to pay attention to how other people in their group spend their time.

6. Students write in their journal comparing their weekly schedule with the schedules of their partners. They may use the following questions:

Describe how the other people in your group spend their time.

How are you similar to them?

How are you different from them?

Would you like to change how you spend your time in any way?

 

PP8 Deal with change, i.e. flexibility, adaptability, updating skills, positive attitude toward growth

ACTIVITY ONE (PP 8)

Objective: Students will be able to understand that making changes often involves making trade-offs.

1. The instructor writes on the board two or three changes that s/he made in his/her life over the last year.

2. S/he asks the students, "What do you think I had to give up in order to make these changes occur in my life?" The class responds.

3. The instructor erases the board. Students are invited to go to the board and write down a change that occurred in their lives over the last year.

4. One by one the class looks at each change and discusses what that person may have had to give up in order for that change to occur.

5. Students fill out the handout "Making Changes."

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PP 8)

Objective: Students will be able to initiate change in their lives in a resourceful way.

1. The instructor will write on the board a change s/he is wanting to create in her/his life.

2. S/he asks the students to help her/him brainstorm different solutions to this change s/he would like to make and writes those on the board.

3. The students break into pairs and are given the handout "Generating Possibilities."

4. Each student spends a few moments individually figuring out a change s/he would like to make. The student then generates ideas about how to manage the change. The partners share their list with each other, and one at a time, help one another expand their list of possibilities. Once back in the whole group, students share their responses to the exercise

 

ACTIVITY THREE (PP 8)

Objective: Students will execute a planned change.

1. The instructor will share with the class a planned change s/he intends to make. (See the "Making Change a Part of My Life" handout.)

2. S/he then gives out the handout, "Making Change a Part of My Life."

3. The students pick an activity from the list or make one up on their own

4. In a week, the students and instructor return and share their stories.

 

ACTIVITY FOUR (PP 8)

Objective: Students will design a planned change

1. The instructor gives an example of a time s/he initiated change at home or at work.

2. S/he then asks students to come up with a situation that involves others that s/he would like to see changed.

3. The instructor distributes the handout "The Four P's," and has the students break into groups of 4-5.

4. Students take turns brainstorming on ways they can plan the change using "The Four P's."

 

ACTIVITY FIVE (PP 8)

Objective: Students will create affirmations to help them cope with changes in their lives.

1. The instructor recalls the changes that students shared in activity one. ("John said that he had to get trained to do a new kind of work." "Lamar said that he had to move to a new city.")

2. The instructor asks the students, "Is it easy to make changes?"

3. The instructor introduces the idea of affirmations. S/he says that affirmations are positive statements we say to ourselves to help us through rough times. The instructor writes an affirmation on the board that s/he uses to help him/her cope with change. ("I am brave." "I deserve to have good things happen in my life.")

4. The instructor asks the students to call out affirmations that they can think of. S/he writes them on the board.

5. Individually, students choose one to three affirmations that they like.

6. Students yell out their affirmations in unison.

7. One by one, students share their affirmations.

 

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT CAREER PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT (PC)

PC1 Relate education and life experiences to career choices

ACTIVITY ONE (PC 1)

Objective: Students will be able recognize the impact and influence of relatives in making personal career decisions.

1. The instructor draws a job tree of his/her own. (See Handout "Family Job Tree.")

2. Students draw their own job trees including relatives who have had a significant impact on their lives.

3. In pairs, students share their trees.

4. The instructor passes out the "Job Tree Worksheet" and students answer the questions.

5. Students volunteer to stand up and share with the class how they are similar and dissimilar to members of their family.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PC 1)

Objective: Students will be able to see that they have aptitude for work.

1. Students are asked to think of the success that they have had in their lives. They can be such things as: a home run, learning to braid hair, getting good grades, etc.

2. Students list their successes sequentially, starting with when they were young and continuing to the present day. (They should try to list at least ten.)

3. In small groups, students take turn sharing their successes with each other. The group then decides which attitudes and skills were necessary for that success to happen and the person they are talking about lists those skills on the bottom or back of their piece of paper.

4. Students suggest two or three job titles for each other based on what they learned about each others past successes, interests and skills.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (PC 1)

Objective: Students will be able to create a career ladder.

1. The instructor asks the students what their employment goals are. Students respond.

2. The instructor draws a ladder on the board. On the bottom rung s/he writes the name of his/her current job. On the top rung s/he writes the name of his/her dream job.

3. The instructor points out that this is a career ladder and that each rung between where a person currently is and where s/he wishes to go signifies a step in that direction.

4. The instructor fills out the rungs on his/her career ladder to illustrate the steps s/he would need to go through in order to reach his/her ideal job.

5. Students create their own career ladders.

6. Students share their ladders with a partner. The partner is instructed to give feedback in regards to the following questions which are written on the board:

Are the steps that your partner needs to go through accurate?

Did s/he leave any steps out?

Could s/he delete a step?

How much time does it seem your partner will need to reach his/her goal?

7. Students save their career ladder for future reference. They can look back on it in a given amount of time to see if they have made progress on it or else need to revise it.

 

PC 2 Identify occupational requirements in job areas of interest, including self-employment

ACTIVITY ONE (PC 2)

Objective: Students will be able to identify jobs of interest.

1. The students are asked to think about jobs that they would like to do for a year.

2. The instructor passes out the worksheet, "Finding Out About Work." Students fill it out individually.

3. After completing the worksheet, the class discusses how they would go about setting up an interview with someone.

4. In pairs, the students practice interviewing each other, using the eight questions on the handout and adding any others they think are valuable.

5. Students create an interview of their own and seek out someone to interview who does the kind of work that they are interested in doing.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PC 2)

Objective: Students will be able to identify job areas that interest them the most and areas which interest them the least.

1. Students stand up and mill around the room asking each other two questions:

"What kind of job would be the most appealing to you?"

"What kind of job would be the least appealing to you?"

2. After several minutes, students sit next to two or three people whom they are very different from.

3. Each group of students gets an envelope containing strips of paper. (See the handout: "My Kind Of Work." )

4. The people in each group divide up the strips. Each person is responsible for teaching his/her classmates the information on his/her strip(s). (The information discusses skill requirements in major areas of employment).

5. From the information shared in their groups, students individually determine one area of employment that they like and one area of employment they dislike.

6. Individuals in class share the areas of employment they like and those they dislike.

 

PC5 Do a self-assessment of values, occupational interests and personal preferences

ACTIVITY ONE (PC 5)

Objective: Students will be able to recognize skills they possess and enjoy using on the job.

1. Students volunteer to stand up and share skills that they have and what their favorite job was and why. (Tell students that thinking on one's feet is an important skill to have; ask them for the reasons why.)

2. The instructor passes out the "Skills and Attributes Inventory" (two pages). Students fill them out and answer the questions that follow.

3. Students divide a piece of paper in half. On one side they write down employment skills they currently possess. On the other they write down employment skills that they wish to master.

4. Students share their lists in pairs. They give each other advice on how to master those skills identified. They also give each other suggestions on jobs they seem suited for.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PC 5)

Objective: Students will be able to relate future educational experiences to career choices.

1. The instructor shares what s/he really likes about his/her job. S/he asks students to share what they really like about their jobs.

2. The instructor passes out,"What I Like In a Job." Students fill out the worksheet to further determine what they really like in a job.

3. As a class, the students discuss their answers.

4. Students call out jobs they would like to have. Together the class identifies what kinds of education and training are necessary in order to get that job.

5. The instructor takes the students on a tour of a community college or other place that offers job training and further educational options, or else brings in various catalogues and brochures in order to assist the students in exploring the training and educational options available to them in the community.

 

PERSONAL MANAGEMENT LIFE SKILLS (PL)

PL2 Understand methods and procedures used to purchase foods and services, e.g. cash, credit, catalog

ACTIVITY ONE (PL 2)

Objective: Students will be able to understand the concept of credit.

1. The instructor writes down a few phrases on the board such as:

"Why put off for tomorrow what you can have today."

"Save it for a rainy day."

"A penny saved is a penny earned."

"Money doesn't grow on trees."

Students give their interpretation of these phrases and indicate whether or not they agree with them.

2. The instructor pulls out a credit card. Students discuss the following question: "Suppose you met someone who didn't know what this was. How would you explain it to him/her?"

3. The instructor gets 2 volunteers in front of the class. One person gets a blank check made out to a car dealership for $10,000. The other student gets a lease agreement. The instructor shows a picture of a nice car.

4. To the student with the check the instructor says, "Well, you are paying cash for the car in full today. It's costing you $10,000. I guess you've been saving up for this car. Here's the keys. Have fun!"

5. To the other student the instructor says, "Well, let's sign this lease. You're paying $1000 down and $400 a month for 36 months. That comes to a total of $15,400. You're going to look so cool in your new car!"

6. The instructor writes on the board "Cash" -$10,000 "Credit"-$15,400.

7. Students discuss the pros and cons of using credit.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PL 2)

Objective: Students will understand the pros and cons of using credit.

1. Students are given the handout, "The Advantages and Disadvantages of Using Credit."

2. Students fill out the handout and compare their answers with a partner.

3. The instructor goes over the handout with the class.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (PL 2)

Objective: Students will be able to figure out the cost of using credit.

1. The instructor tells a story about using credit and includes how much it costs in interest to use credit.

2. S/he passes out the handout, "The Cost of Credit". and goes through step by step how to figure out the amount of interest paid. The steps are written on the board.

3. Students complete the handout.

4. Students write a paragraph explaining to someone what credit means and gives examples. The instructor hands out the paragraphs to a group of students who actually don't understand what credit means. The second group of students read the first group's writing and write on their papers whether or not the explanation helped them understand what credit means.

 

PL3 Understand methods and procedures used to obtain housing and services and related maintenance, i.e., rent, lease, buy

ACTIVITY ONE (PL 3)

Objective: Students will be able to name several possible living arrangements and to define related vocabulary.

1. The instructor asks the students to describe different kinds of living arrangements, i.e. rent, buy, live with roommates, rent a room, live in help, etc

2. With a partner, students define the following vocabulary which is written on the board: Lease, Real estate, Rental agency, Furnished apartment, Roommate, Security deposit, Unfurnished apartment, Verbal agreement, Lease agreement, Shelter, Down payment, Damage deposit, Mortgage payment.

3. The instructor asks for the definitions. Students call them out. The instructor writes them on the board. The students copy down what is written if they hadn't known the meaning before hand.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PL 3)

Objective: Students will be able to relate/learn several means of obtaining housing.

1. The instructor makes a flowchart showing how s/he went about finding housing. The instructor explains that a flowchart shows sequence and that a box symbolizes one action, and a diamond symbolizes a decision.

2. Each student makes a flowchart showing how s/he obtained their current housing.

3. In small groups, students share their flowcharts and ask each other questions meant to clarify information or to ask for further information, such as:

What do you mean by _________________?

Tell me more about ___________________?

4. Students share the different ways that people in their group obtained housing and the instructor writes them on the board.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (PL 3)

Objective: Students will be able to use the classified ads to obtain housing.

1. The instructor asks the students if they ever use the classified ads to obtain housing. The students respond.

2. The instructor asks the students for the common abbreviations found in housing ads. Students respond and the instructor writes them on the board. (S/he may have to include some overlooked by the students).

3. Students again identify what all of the abbreviations stand for.

4. The instructor hands out housing ads from the local paper.

5. Students choose two apartments and one house from the ads and fill out the handout, "Looking For A Place To Live".

 

ACTIVITY FOUR (PL 3)

Objective: Students will set future housing goals.

1. Students make a collage illustrating their dream home. They can use magazines, scissors, glue, construction paper, magic markers and so on.

2. All of the collages are displayed in front of the class and the students take turns presenting their collages to their classmates.

3. Students write about their dream home.

 

PL 4 Manage money, i.e. major purchases, savings, credit

ACTIVITY ONE (PL 4)

Objective: Students will be able to see the attitudes they have about money.

1. The instructor asks the students, "What is money?'

2. Students take the "What Does Money Mean To You?" survey.

3. Students compare and contrast their attitudes in pairs. On one side of a piece of paper they write down their similarities. On the other side they write down their differences.

4. Students join together and brainstorm list of helpful attitudes to have concerning money.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PL 4)

Objective: Students will be able to discuss the issue of saving money, and to use related vocabulary.

1. Students fill in the blanks of the following sentences:

People can save money when

It is hard to save money when

I'd like to save money in order to buy a

People can save money by cutting down on

2. Students get into groups of three or four and share their answers.

3. Students volunteer to share their answers with the class.

4. Students work alone or in pairs filling in the blanks of the "Saving Money" handout.

5. The instructor provides the correct answers.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (PL 4)

Objective: Students will understand the differences between banks, credit unions, and savings and loan institutions.

1. Students are given the "Financial Institutions" handout and a phone book.

2. Students call different institutions to find out the information needed to fill out the handout.

3. Students may wish to work in groups on gathering the information, thus dividing up the tasks.

 

ACTIVITY FOUR (PL 4)

Objective: Students will be able to express their attitude toward saving money and to understand the attitudes of others.

1. Students fill out the "Savings Survey" handout.

2. Students compare and contrast their answers with a partner. They note the similarities and differences on a piece of paper.

3. Each pair of students shares their similarities and differences in regards to saving money with the whole class. They are written on the board. (One half of the board is devoted to similarities. The other half of the board is for differences).

4. Students call out several sentences to generalize, if possible, the class's attitude toward saving money. ("Most people in this class________." "Some people in this class____________.")

5. Students write a paragraph describing their attitude toward saving money and in that paragraph also compare their attitudes with those of their classmates.

 

ACTIVITY FIVE (PL 4)

Objective: Students will be able to understand the value of creating a budget for future purchases.

1. The instructor shares one of his/her long-term purchasing goals.

2. Students each share one of their long term purchasing goals. The instructor writes them on the board.

3. Students fill out the "Purchasing Goal Sheet" using catalogues or newspaper ads to estimate the cost of their purchasing goal.

4. The instructor discusses the idea of making a budget.

5. Students create a budget for themselves and figure out the most money they would be able to save per month.

6. After computing how much money they will be able to save per month, students figure out how long it will take them to save up for their purchasing goal.

7. Students may wish to alter their budgets or investigate other means of saving for long term purchasing goals.

 

ACTIVITY SIX (PL 4)

Objective: Students will be able to negotiate a budget with someone.

1. Students get into pairs.

2. Each pair is given 100 beans (60 brown, 40 white), 10 baby jars, and 10 post-it notes.

3. Students label the baby jars using the post it notes with their monthly expense categories. For example, one jar is labeled, "Rent" another jar is labeled, "Food," etc.

4. Students share how they labeled their jars.

5. Students may wish to relabel their jars.

6. Students are told that each brown bean is worth $20.00 and each white bean is worth $10.00.

7. Students divide the beans into the jars, thus budgeting their money.

8. Each pair of students joins with another pair and shares how they budgeted their money. Each pair then writes a paragraph comparing and contrasting their budget with the other pairs budget.

 

ACTIVITY SEVEN (PL 4)

Objective: Students will be able to alter a budget (do in conjunction with activity six).

1. The pairs of students are told that one of them lost his/her job and that now they have only 70 beans (40 brown and 30 white).

2. Students have to reorganize their beans.

3. Students share how they revised their budget.

4. Students write a paragraph sharing how it felt to create a budget with someone else and how they felt going from making $1600 a month to making $1,000 a month.

5. Students share how they altered their budget.

 

ACTIVITY EIGHT (PL 4)

Objective: Students will be able to differentiate between fixed and flexible expenses.

1. The instructor divides the board into two. In one section s/he writes "Fixed." In the other section s/he writes "Flexible."

2. Students brainstorm expenses that fit into each category.

3. Students complete the "Fixed or Flexible Expenses" handout.

4. Students share which expenses they would cut back on first if need be.

 

PL 5 Understand basic laws and resources that protect workers and consumers, i.e. labor regulations, consumer protection laws, anti-discrimination laws

ACTIVITY ONE (PL 5)

Objective: Students will be able to understand workers' rights legislation.

1. The instructor draws a time line that includes five specific federal laws concerning workers' rights. (See Handout "Federal Laws.")

2. The instructor leads the class in a discussion about the legislation.

3. The instructor describes several instances of discrimination in the workplace. The class decides which law is being violated.

4. The instructor passes out the handout "What Form of Discrimination Is It?" and students decide which law is being violated.

5. The class brainstorms a list of employee and employer rights and their suggestions are written on the board. The instructor passes out the handout, "Employee Rights/Employer Rights" and the lists are discussed.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PL 5)

Objective: Students will discuss the individual's responsibility in regards to employment.

1. The students are read a quote by Dr. Martin Luther King. (See "Unemployment." handout )

2. Individually, students fill out a worksheet containing reflective questions about the quote. ( See "Unemployment " handout )

3. The instructor leads the class in a discussion of their answers.

4. Students in the class develop a handout entitled "Employment Responsibility." In it they make rules in regards to each individual citizen's responsibility in terms of employment. They may also wish to discuss the government's responsibility as well.

 

PL9 Understand how to locate and use different types of transportation and interpret related travel information

ACTIVITY ONE (PL 9)

Objective: Students will be able to identify different types of transportation systems and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each.

1. Students brainstorm all of the means of transportation they can think of.

2. Students interview each other asking the following questions:

How would your life style change if you had/didn't have a car?

How would your life change if there were no mass transportation?

Would you ever join a carpool? Why or why not?

3. Students, alone or in pairs, fill out the "Comparing Means of Transportation" handout.

4. The class discusses the handout.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PL 9)

Objective: Students will be able to assess the differences between various forms of transportation in terms of cost and length of travel time required.

1. Using a map as a visual aid, students brainstorm four to six places they'd like to go to. They show where those places are on the map.

2. In pairs, students discuss what modes of transportation they would take to each of those places and why they would favor that mode of transportation.

3. Students then each choose one specific destination and determine all of the means of transportation available to go to that place. They write down all of the possible modes of transportation on a piece of paper.

4. Students use the phone book to look up the numbers of those transportation sources and write those numbers down on their paper.

5. Students call the transportation sources and find out how much the trip would cost and how long it would take and write down that information.

6. Students figure out a way to organize and display all of the information they have gathered neatly.

7. Students share their findings with the class.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (PL 9)

Objective: Students will be able to read a bus schedule.

1. The instructor or students gather bus schedules from the community and bring them to class.

2. Students say whether or not they use the bus. If they use the bus they indicate which bus lines they use.

3. Students answer the following types of questions in relation to the bus schedule:

What is the fare?

Do you pay when you get on or get off?

What number would you call to complain about a rude driver?

What happens to the bus service on Christmas and Thanksgiving?

How long does it take to go from x to y?

How can you get to x?

4. Students write a sequential paragraph describing a bus route.

 

PL10 Understand concepts of time

ACTIVITY ONE (PL 10)

Objective: Students will be able to convert minutes to hours.

1. The instructor tells a story about working overtime, such as: "I worked 20 minutes of overtime today. I get paid $15.00 an hour whenever I work overtime. I wonder how much I'll get paid for 20 minutes of overtime. Does anyone know?" (Someone may know how to convert minutes to hours and then multiply by the overtime rate of pay).

2. The instructor changes minutes to hours by means of a fraction 20/60=1/3.

3. The instructor then multiplies 1/3 x 15/1=15/3=5. $5 will be earned in overtime.

4. Students convert minutes to fractions in several examples provided by the instructor.

5. Students create 4-6 story problems for each other to answer

 

PL14 Understand common ailments and seek appropriate medical assistance

ACTIVITY ONE (PL 14)

Objective: Students will be able to identify common health problems and common home remedies.

1. The class brainstorms common health problems. They are written on the board. Students may also wish to share why they last sought medical help.

2. The students get into pairs or small groups and discuss the following questions about each ailment:

How would you treat each of these ailments before going to a medical professional?

When would you know to visit a medical professional?

What do you think s/he would do for you?

3. Their answers are shared. The instructor and other students will need to identify any dubious sorts of treatments that they hear.

4. The instructor passes out the handout, "To Your Health." Students match the items and discuss whether or not they have tried any of those remedies for common illness. The instructor reads through the handout with the students and asks them specific information about its content.

5. The instructor shares with the class a few medical type encyclopedias that can be accessed from the library and shows them how they can be used to look up information regarding various symptoms. S/he also shares with the class any "Medinfo" numbers that exist in the community.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PL 14)

Objective: Students will define health, assess their own health and make a health-related goal.

1. Students share words that come to their mind when they think of the word "health" and they are written on the board.

2. The instructor passes out the "How Is Your Health?" assessment form.

3. Students take the assessment.

4. Students get into pairs and compare their results. They note similarities and differences on a piece of paper.

5. Student write down a health-related goal they can make for themselves and share it with another person.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (PL 14)

Objective: Students will be able to understand how to use medications.

1. Students brainstorm common medications people take and may wish to share any that they take.

2. The instructor takes out a box of empty medication containers and distributes them to the students. The students get into pairs look at the labels and answer the following questions:

Why would you take this medication?

How often would you take it? For how many days?

Should you take it alone or with food, or with liquid?

Are there any side effects? If so, what are they?

Would you give this medication to a child? Why?

Would you give this medication to an older person?

Why would you take this medication?

Who shouldn't take this medicine?

3. The entire class regroups, and each pair of students gets in front of the class and introduces their medication.

 

PL17 Understand Basic Health And Safety Procedures

ACTIVITY ONE (PL 17)

Objective: Students will be able to assess the possible dangers in performing several jobs, and to discuss preventative measures.

1. The instructor tells a story describing a job related accident.

2. Students share incidents that they have either heard about or been involved in directly.

3. In pairs or in small groups, students fill out the "Hazards of Working" handout.

4. The instructor goes over the handout with the students.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (PL 17)

Objective: Students will be able to determine the danger in specific job tasks.

1. Students share accidents they have either witnessed or been involved in on the job.

2. The instructor passes out the "Preventing Accidents On the Job" handout.

3. In pairs, students determine the possible dangers inherent in each task.

4. The instructor goes over the handout with the students.

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