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Activities

The following activities can be integrated into themes or be used by themselves to bring improvement in targeted competencies. They are not necessarily meant to be used sequentially; rather read through the activities which address the skill you wish to cover, then choose the ones which best suit the needs and interests of your learners.

GROUP EFFECTIVENESS

INTERPERSONAL (GI)

GI 1 Develop relationship skills including trust, risk, empathy, listening, sharing, responsibility, respect for others, and the expression of feelings.

Choose one or more of these activities to help students learn each other's names and to get acquainted.

 

ACTIVITY ONE (GI 1)

Objective: Students will learn each other's names.

1. Everyone sits in a circle.

2. The first person introduces him/her self and includes a piece of information.

3. The next person repeats what the first person said and adds a piece of information about him/herself.

4. The next person repeats what the first person and the second person said and adds his/her own information.

5. This continues around the circle until finally the last person has to repeat what everyone has said.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (GI 1)

Objective: Students will learn a little about each other.

SET-UP: The instructor writes 3 introductory questions on the board. For example:
"Where did you hear about this program?"
"What are your goals for the future?"
"What was your favorite subject in school?"

1. Everyone stands in a circle.

2. The introductory questions are written on the board.

3. The instructor holds the ball, says his/her name and answers one question.

4. The instructor throws the ball to someone and this person says his/her name and answers one of the questions.

5. The ball is thrown to a new person until everyone has introduced themselves and answered a question.

6. Students return to their seats and write down their classmates' names and any information they can recall.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (GI 1)

Objective: Students will find out what they have in common with one another.

1. The Instructor models a conversation with two or more other students geared to finding similarities.

(" I like to_____. How about you ?")

2. Students get into groups and find three things they have in common with one another.

3. One spokesperson from each group reports back their group's similarities to the class.

4. Students regroup and repeat the process until most students have met everyone.

5. Students write paragraph on the similarities and differences s/he has with others.

 

ACTIVITY FOUR (GI 1)

Objective: Students create interviews to get to know each other better.

1. Students get into groups of four to six.

2. They decide on four to six questions to ask each other.

3. They make a grid: On one side the group members names are written. The other side has the questions.

4. Students answer the questions in turn. The listeners write down the answers.

5. Grids from each group are displayed in the class.

 

ACTIVITY FIVE (GI 1)

Objective: The instructor is able to see which students identify themselves as proficient in various skills.

Students will also be able to see who they can use as resources in the classroom.

1. The instructor creates a "Find Someone Who" exercise using skills s/he plans on covering in the class.

(See sample "Find Someone Who").

2. To complete a "find someone who" students stand up and mill around the classroom asking each other questions to determine who in the class can satisfy one or more of the 10 items. When someone is found who satisfies that item his/her name is written down. The activity ends when a student has a name next to each item.

3. Upon completion, students get into small groups and share the skills that they already have and make a list of their common goals based on what they find interesting in the "find someone who".

 

ACTIVITY SIX (GI 1)

Objective: Students develop relationships as they share information about themselves.

1. Students fill out the sentence stem (the teacher can create them).

2. Students share their responses with one another in small groups

3. Each group shares 2-3 interesting pieces of information they found.

4. Individually students summarize their similarities and differences in writing.

Sample Stems:

  • A good thing that happened to me recently was____________________.
  • In my family____________________.
  • My goal for the future is to__________________.
  • What I remember most about school growing up was_______________.
  • It really gets on my nerves when_____________.
  • I get along best with others when________________.

 

ACTIVITY SEVEN (GI 1)

Objective: Students will find out their similarities and differences.

1. The instructor marks one side of the room "Yes" and the other side of the room "No".

2. The instructor calls out a "Yes/No" question and students organize themselves somewhere along the continuum. For example: "Should schools have grades?" or " Do you think 30 hours a week should mean full-time instead of 40?"

3. After each statement, students have a minute to talk about their beliefs comparing themselves with the person next to them and readjusting themselves if necessary. Their positions can be graphed.

4. Students write about their experience using the following prompts:

"Did you end up standing next to one person a lot? If so, were you surprised about who you ended up standing next to? How would you describe your belief system? How do you compare with the other students in the class?"

 

LISTENING AND COMMUNICATING

Several activities follow which provide students an opportunity to assess their listening skills, examine the importance of being a good listener and practice listening. Students also have the opportunity to analyze various aspects of verbal communication including the use of formal and informal language.

 

ACTIVITY EIGHT (GI 1)

Objective: Students become aware of how it feels to listen to others and to be listened to.

1. Students generate a few conversation topics and they are written on the board.

2. The instructor introduces the listening stick. People can speak when they are holding the stick; otherwise they must listen and remain silent.

3. Someone begins speaking by giving his/her opinion on one of the topics written on the board. S/he passes the stick to someone else and then that person can speak. This can continue for a given amount of time or until everyone has spoken.

4. After a period of time, students write down their feelings in relation to the activity , answering questions such as:

"How did you feel when you held the stick?" "Did you feel that you had to talk quickly, or did you feel like you could take your time?" "How did you feel when you wanted to say something but you didn't have the stick?" "Is listening easy for you?" "On a scale of 1-10, (with 10 being the highest) how would you rate yourself as a listener?"

 

ACTIVITY NINE (GI 1)

Objective: Students will gain a sense of trust and see the importance of listening.

SET-UP: The instructor creates a simple obstacle course in the classroom, or outside. It needs to be wide enough to accommodate individual variation.

1. Students pair up. One person is the "coach". The other person is the "explorer"

2. The explorers put paper bags over their heads and gather together.

3. The coaches stand in one area. At the signal, the coaches give their explorers directions on where to go and what to do.

4. The first explorer to complete the course wins.

5. Students write in their journal how it felt to play their particular role. Was it easier to be a coach or an explorer? Why?

 

ACTIVITY TEN (GI 1)

Objective: Students will be able to assess their own listening skills and determine area(s) they would like to improve.

1. The teacher leads a discussion regarding good listening skills using the following prompt: "How do you know if someone is a good listener? What do good listeners do? What do poor listeners do?"

2. The instructor hands out the "Assessing Your Listening Ability " form.

3. Students assess their own listening behavior using this form.

4. Students share their feelings about their assessment results in pairs, or write about their results in a journal. They describe their own good listening skills and those they wish to improve.

 

ACTIVITY ELEVEN (GI 1)

Objective: Students will be able to identify traits and values that a good listener possesses.

1. Students think about someone whom they consider to be a good listener. They brainstorm traits that s/he has on a piece of paper.

2. Students may share their particular "listener" with the group.

3. Students read through the handout, "How Good Listeners View The World."

4. Students put aside the handout, get into pairs or small groups, and see if they can recall the six traits of good listeners as mentioned in the handout.

5. The whole class together recalls the six good listening traits and the instructor writes them on the board.

6. Students, in pairs, read scenarios in "What Kind Of Values Do These Listeners Possess?" and determine what good/poor listening value(s) each person has.

 

ACTIVITY TWELVE (GI 1)

Objective: Students will understand the concept of paraphrasing.

1. The instructor has one student come to the front of the class and asks the student a few questions requiring somewhat lengthy answers, such as: "What was your high school experience like?", or "What would be an ideal night on the town to you?" (Do not ask yes/no questions).

2. The instructor exhibits good listening behavior by paraphrasing what the student says: "So what you're saying is that________".

3. The student sits down and the instructor asks for feedback from the class on how s/he listened. S/he introduces the concept of paraphrasing.

4. The instructor asks the students if they ever paraphrase in their lives and if so, when? Students share experiences they've had with paraphrasing, and cite reasons why paraphrasing is done, such as: to calm someone down, to show that you understand, and to let the person know that you care about what is being said.

5. The instructor writes on the board the reasons for paraphrasing and the language commonly used in paraphrasing, for example:

  • "What I hear you saying is that ."
  • "In other words you think that ."
  • "Am I correct in assuming that you think that ."
  • "I see where you're coming from. You think that ."

6. Students are given a couple of minutes to think about their future goals, or a decision/dilemma they are now facing.

7. Students get into pairs. One group of partners leaves the room. The other group is told that the object of the exercise is to see how long they can get their partners to keep talking. They can use only paraphrasing to do this. The pair which has the one partner talking the longest is the winner, (note: the listening partner is not allowed to contribute to the discussion in any way, other than to paraphrase).

8. Students write a paragraph describing how it felt for them to have their particular role, and whether or not they paraphrase now or will paraphrase in the future.

 

ACTIVITY THIRTEEN (GI 1)

Objective: Students will be able to paraphrase while in the process of trying to reach consensus on a situation.

1. Students write a paragraph describing their ideal place to live in terms of climate, population, economy, and cultural activities.

2. Students read through the "You Are Going To Move" handout, write down which place they would choose to move to, and why and which place they would not like to move to and why.

3. In groups of four, students reach consensus on which place to live. They are instructed to paraphrase what the last person said prior to giving their own opinion.

4. Students assess their listening ability using the "Assessing Your Listening Ability" form (use a fresh assessment form if they already did this in activity two).

 

ACTIVITY FOURTEEN (GI 1)

Objective: Students will identify speaking habits they appreciate in others and those they find annoying.

1. The following sentence stems are written on the board:

____________________is someone who is a good communicator.

I like listening to people who_____________________________________________

I can tell when someone knows what they are talking about when they ____________________________________________________________________

I think I am a ______________________communicator.

I can't stand to be around people who_________________________when they talk.

I stop paying attention to people when they__________________________________

I can tell when someone doesn't know what they are talking about when___________

2. Students complete the sentences individually and then share their ideas in small groups.

3. The class joins together and creates guidelines for speaking effectively. For example:"Effective speakers ought to be sure to____________".

 

ACTIVITY FIFTEEN (GI 1)

Objective: Students will learn a technique to help them organize their ideas and convey information clearly to others.

1. The instructor writes a well known current event on the board.

2. S/he asks students what questions they have about the event. The questions are written on the board.

3. The instructor circles the Wh-words in the questions the students have generated and then writes the Wh-words across the top of the board (What, When, How, Why, Where) . The instructor states that the Wh- words are commonly used to find out information about a situation.

4. The board is erased and the students comes up with a topic of interest and it is written on the board. Again students generate several Wh-questions. The board is then erased.

5. Students brainstorm a list of six to eight topics of interest.

6. Each student chooses one topic and writes out several wh-questions about it. Students then turn their papers over.

7. Students get into small groups and give a monologue on their topic answering the questions they had written down from memory.

8. Following each monologue, the other students ask any other questions they have about the topic that weren't answered by the speaker.

9. Students report back whether or not thinking of questions and answers prior to communication is helpful for them.

 

ACTIVITY SIXTEEN (GI 1)

Objective: Students will be able to recognize formal and informal language.

1. From exercise nine students may have induced that rehearsing speech is appropriate in formal language situations. The instructor introduces the concept of formal and informal language. This can be done by asking, "What is the difference between calling up to find out about a job in the newspaper and calling a friend to see what she did over the weekend?"

2. The instructor writes "Formal" on one side of the board, and "Informal" on the other. Students cite several examples of each. Any examples are fine. For example: Would it be possible? (formal); Can I?(informal).

3. The instructor asks the students for examples of situations where formal language is appropriate. S/he also asks students how necessary it is for them to know how to speak formally.

4. Individually or in small groups, students fill out the handout, "Language Use"

5. The whole class goes over the possible answers.

6. In pairs, students create role-plays where they use at least two of the formal phrases.

 

ACTIVITY SEVENTEEN (GI 1)

Objective: Students will be able to give instructions effectively to others.

1. The instructor tells the students about the last time s/he gave instructions to someone. ("I had to explain to someone how to baby-sit my son for four hours.")

2. The instructor asks the students if it is easy for them to give instructions, or to teach someone how to do something. Students are encouraged to cite examples from their lives. A discussion takes place.

3. The instructor writes "Giving Instructions" on the top of the board and under that heading writes the following five guidelines:

Set the stage...I'm going to show you how to clean the oven

Use sequence words...first, second, next, finally

Speak slowly

Check for understanding..."Are you with me so far?"

Give encouragement. "It may seem difficult now, but you'll get the hang of it."

4. Individually students identify something they are able to do that they can teach others how to do. It could be something they do on the job, at home, at school or as a hobby.

5. Students teach others how to do the particular task or activity. Tell them to feel free to use gestures, imaginary objects, and drawings. The listeners are required to repeat back what they were taught in order to prove that they have learned the task.

6. Students report back whether it was easier for them to teach or to learn.

 

ACTIVITY EIGHTEEN (GI 1)

Objective: Students will be able to use the telephone effectively.

1. Students brainstorm different kinds of calls they make on the phone. Their ideas are written on the board.

2. The class divides the calls into two categories: Formal and Informal.

3. The teacher passes out some classified ads that would be of interest to the students.

4. Each student chooses an ad to call and writes down what they would like to find out about that ad.

5. The instructor gives an example of making a formal call in front of the class.

6. Students may refer to the "Language Use" handout as they prepare to make their phone call in front of the class.

7. Students get into pairs and show each other their ads. Pairs role-play their phone call in front of the class. The instructor may offer feedback on language usage.

 

GI2 Recognize and respond in an appropriate way to differences in values, class, culture, ethnicity, lifestyle, point of view, and personal characteristics.

CULTURAL DIVERSITY

It may be helpful to introduce this area of study by pointing out to students that the American workforce is changing rapidly. It is estimated that by the year 2000, African-Americans will represent 13%, Hispanics 16% and Asians 6% of the new entrants into the workforce. Fully 2/3 of the workers in the year 2000 will be people of color and females. Diversity will be the rule rather than the exception. These activities will help students to understand concepts related to culture, values, prejudice and respect. People need specific skills in order to become productive members of a diversified workforce.

 

ACTIVITY ONE (GI 2)

Objective: Students will be able to further assess their own cultural background.

1. The instructor writes "ME" in the middle of the chalkboard and asks the students to call out forces that make them who they are. For example: parents, TV, music.

2. The instructor writes these forces around the word "ME" and makes arrows coming from each "force" pointing to the word "ME".

3. Students are told that they can learn more about their world view and beliefs by examining the past. The instructor passes out "My Autobiography Worksheet"

4. Individually, students fill out the worksheet.

5. Students get into small groups and discuss the following questions:

Did you find out anything that you hadn't known about yourself?

What are two things that influenced you heavily growing up?

Do you have any values that you would like to change?

How can someone go about changing their values/the way they view the world?

6. Students share the highlights of their discussion with the class.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (GI 2)

Objective: Students will recognize specific cultural similarities and differences between themselves and others.

1. The instructor writes the word "culture" on the board and the class discusses what it means.

2. The class brainstorms all of the things that make one culture of people different from another, such as: where a person is from, family structure, food choice, beliefs concerning marriage and children, beliefs regarding money and work, educational traditions, housing, language, religion, sexual practices, body language etc.

3. Students each get a piece of paper and write their name in the middle. They surround their name with all of the ideas brainstormed in activity one. They connect those words/phrases to their names. From those words/phrases they write down specific examples of those items. For example: Name_______________ food eaten____________fast food (students thus create a mindmap).

4. In groups of three or four, individuals share their mindmaps with one another.

5. Students record their cultural differences and similarities on a piece of paper divided into two columns. One column is labeled "Differences", the other "Similarities."

6. Students share two to three highlights of their discussion.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (GI 2)

Objective: Students will recognize causes of stereotypes and assumptions.

1. The instructor brings in a gag ice cube or other gag object and asks the class "What is going to happen?" (The class will naturally say. "The ice is going to melt.") The instructor then asks them how they know that will happen.

2. The instructor shows the class that the ice (or whatever) isn't going to do what they expect it to do.

3. The instructor shows various pictures to the students and asks them to give their "gut" reactions to them, and explain why they think that way.

4. The instructor writes the following questions on the board and the students discuss them in small groups:

Does making assumptions about others ever come in handy?

What are some assumptions that you've made about others in your life?

Were they correct?

What are assumptions often based on?

5. Students write out assumptions they have made of several people in class. They then have time to check to see if their assumptions are correct. For example: "LeeAnn seems like the type of person who takes a lot of time getting ready in the morning. Is that right LeeAnn?"

6. Students write a paragraph describing the assumptions people in class had of them and whether or not they were accurate, and how they felt about them.

 

ACTIVITY FOUR (GI 2)

Objective: Students are able to understand their own cultural /personal affinities and see the affinities of others around them.

1. Students get into a circle and are told that this activity is to be done in silence. "I am going to call out specific habits and roles we take on in our lives. When you identify with what I am saying step forward two steps into the circle."

2. The instructor can choose a diverse range of items (usually around 20) that are used to identify people such as: talks to strangers easily, touches others easily, would consider living abroad, is a go-getter, has more than one race someone in their family was not of their prominent skin color, identifies with a foreign culture (non-U.S.), can speak another language, drinks alcohol, likes rap music, likes violent/action movies, is a parent, likes to work hard, likes to dress up in the latest style, is quiet, is outgoing, etc.

3. Students sit down and in pairs and create their own circle activity. They list interesting habits/roles they believe that apply to people in the class. Next to each item they write down the number of people in class they believe will step forward. They will then call out those items and see who steps forward.

4. Several pairs of students try out their circle activity with the class. Afterwards they report if anything surprised them. (Perhaps they thought only two people knew how to use a computer when in fact five did.) Were their assumptions usually correct?

ACTIVITY FIVE (GI 2)

Objective: To develop trust and respect differences among class members.

1. The instructor makes three circles on the board, labels them: friend, acquaintance, and stranger and asks, "What is the difference between a friend, an acquaintance and a stranger?" The instructor records the responses.

2. The instructor puts two way arrows between the circles and asks the students how people can change categories.

3. The instructor erases the board and then divides it in two. One side is labeled "Situation" the other side is labeled, " Why".

4. The instructor asks students to identify a time when they made the first step to get to know someone better and why. The students' responses are recorded on the board.

5. The instructor introduces the "Disclosure Questionnaire". The purpose of the disclosure questionnaire is to experience getting to know someone you don't know well.

6. Students in the class pair up with someone they know least well.

7. Partners use the "Disclosure Questionnaire" to start a dialogue.

8. Each student talks for fifteen minutes without being interrupted in response to a few of the questions. The listener is instructed to encourage further conversation by showing agreement, paraphrasing, and not interrupting.

9. Students fill out the "Positive Feedback From" and give it to their partner.

10. Students write in their journal what they learned about their partner, their similarities and differences, and how it felt to really listen to someone and really be listened to.

 

ACTIVITY SIX (GI 2)

Objective: To understand that our culture often causes us to act and perceive things automatically in given situations.

1. The instructor makes a big circle on the board and labels it "Me". S/he then makes several small circles on the board and labels them as being from other cultural groups, such as: "Japanese"; "People from the South" etc. S/he asks the class what the significance is of the drawing. (People may discuss how individuals often see themselves as the center of the universe.)

2. The instructor asks the students "Which culture is best? Why?"

3. The instructor tells the students that the way we are raised and our culture gives us tendencies to see things in a certain way, to have automatic perceptions. Students are asked to give examples of this.

4. Students fill out the handout entitled, "My Automatic Pilot".

5. Students share their perceptions with one other.

6. Students can respond to each other by asking questions or making a feedback statement such as: "I see that the first thing that comes to your mind when you think of is . "

7. Students write in their journals when and where they first remember getting those stereotypes/prejudices.

 

ACTIVITY SEVEN (GI 2)

Objectives: Students explain their values to others in relation to common workplace issues.

1. Students are told that company XYZ has some very serious, yet common workplace issues to contend with which hamper productivity but cannot all be dealt with at the same time.

2. Students are handed out "What Needs To Happen First" and rate the ten items on their own.

3. Students get into groups of three and attempt to reach consensus on prioritizing their lists.

4. After ten minutes students share with the class whether or not their group was able to reach consensus, and why they were or weren't able to do so.

5. Students write in their journal how it felt to express their values and whether or not it was easy for them to be flexible.

 

ACTIVITY EIGHT (GI 2)

Objective: Students will be able to recognize possible things to think about when working with people from other cultures.

1. The instructor asks the students, "How well do you get along with people different from yourself," and mentions several environments: at home, in the neighborhood, at work, at school. Students volunteer answers and include examples.

2. The instructor hands out the "Cultural Awareness Self-Assessment" form (4 pages).

3. Students circle those items which they have experienced and underline those items that they think are important to be aware of.

4. Students share their answers in pairs.

5. The groups report back highlights of their discussions.

 

ACTIVITY NINE (GI 2)

Objective: Students will recognize feelings of cultural discomfort in themselves and come up with strategies to help them cope.

1. Students brainstorm social situations when they feel uncomfortable. Those are recorded on the board, or students can write about them privately in their journals. ex: "I feel uncomfortable when I am with a group of children" or, "I feel weird when I'm around someone who I know is gay."

2. Students read the handout, "Eight Instances of Cultural Discomfort" and add on other instances if desired.

3. In small groups students discuss how they would react if the person complaining in each situation were a close friend of theirs.

4. Individually, students choose someone in one of those scenarios and write him/her a short letter of advice.

 

ACTIVITY TEN (GI 2)

Objective: Students will experience racism, sexism or any other "ism" through literature or poetry.

1. The instructor brings in poetry, short excerpts from literature and/or music lyrics which reflect any "ism" (racism, sexism, homophobia, etc.).

2. See: "What To Do With Reading" for suggestions on reading activities.

 

GI5 Recognize sexual or racial harassment in the workplace and identify appropriate steps to address it

ACTIVITY ONE (GI 5)

Objective: Students will define sexual harassment.

1. The instructor writes "Sexual harassment" on the board. Students share words that come to their mind when they think of sexual harassment and they are written on the board.

2. The instructor passes out the quiz "Is This Sexual Harassment?" Students take the quiz individually.

3. Students get into groups of four to six and compare their answers. When there are discrepancies they are instructed to try and reach agreement on the correct answers.

4. The instructor goes over the quiz and provides the correct answers.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (GI 5)

Objective: Students will understand the customary steps involved in addressing a sexual harassment complaint.

1. The instructor asks the students, "What should you do if you experience sexual harassment on the job?" "What should your supervisor do?" Students share their replies.

2. The instructor passes out the "Steps To Stopping Sexual Harassment On The Job."

3. Students read through the steps and discuss the likelihood of those steps occuring at their places of employment.

4. Students turn over the handout and see if they can recall the steps to stopping sexual harassment on the job. The instructor creates a flowchart on the board using the information provided by the students.

 

NEGOTIATION (GN)

GN1 Understand the concept of conflict and use strategies for handling it

Through these activities students will define conflict and become aware of various strategies to handle it.

 

ACTIVITY ONE (GN 1)

Objective: Students will understand the word "conflict."

1. The instructor shows the students various pictures depicting conflict.

2. In pairs, students brainstorm all of the words they can in connection to the word, "Conflict".

3. The teacher writes down on the board all of the words the class comes up with.

4. The class creates a definition of the word conflict.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (GN 1)

Objective: Students will recognize that conflict is all around them.

1. The students and instructor gather a lot of magazines (especially news magazines), glue, construction paper, pens, paint tape, and scissors.

2. Students individually find and cut out images and/or words that represent things that make them feel uncomfortable or ill at ease.

3. Students make collages.

4. Students put their collages in front of the classroom and everyone stands up and gathers around them.

5. Students introduce their collages and share why they chose those specific words and images, how they felt when they created their collage and if they realize anything specific about themselves or their culture when looking at the other collages.

6. Students write a list of things they could do to make their life /society more peaceful and share their ideas with the class. All of the ideas are written on the board.

7. Students may wish to experiment by taking one or more of those ideas and trying them out for a set time period and then reporting back with any differences that occurred in their lives or in their environment.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (GN 1)

Objective: Students will experience conflict through literature or poetry.

1. The instructor brings in poetry, short excerpts from literature, and/or music lyrics which reflect conflict. They are distributed in the class.

2. See: "What To Do With Reading" for suggestions on reading activities.

 

ACTIVITY FOUR (GN 1)

Objective: Students will become familiar with different conflict resolution techniques.

1. On a 3" x 5" card students write down a conflict they experienced and resolved.

2. Students put their cards in a box.

3. One student picks out a card, reads the card, and says how s/he would handle the conflict.

4. After everyone has shared what they would do to solve a particular conflict, everyone writes a paragraph describing how it felt to have their problem solved by someone else, and how they actually solved their problem for themselves.

 

ACTIVITY FIVE (GN 1)

Objective: Students will be able to describe 4 different strategies to managing conflict.

1. The instructor asks the students to call out the strategies people came up with in activity two to deal with conflict.

2. The instructor passes out the "What Is Your Negotiation Style?" handout.

3. Students read the handout silently and then share their "gut" reactions to it.

4. The instructor reads the handout to the students.

5. In small groups, students determine the advantages and disadvantages of each conflict negotiation strategy. They create a three column form to record their ideas. One column is headed by the word "Strategy," one column "Advantages," and the last column "Disadvantages."

6. The instructor asks the students to share the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy and writes down the students' ideas on the board. The class then attempts to agree on the "best" negotiation strategy.

7. The instructor passes out the handout, "The Pros and Cons of Your Negotiation Strategy."

8. Students write a paragraph discussing the approach that they usually use to resolve conflict (along with an example) and the approach that they seldom use and why they don't use it.

 

ACTIVITY SIX (GN 1)

Objective: Students will become familiar with guidelines to negotiating conflict.

1. Students are asked, "When you find yourself in conflict with others are there any guidelines or rules that go through your head, such as, "I better be sure not to call him names?" "I really have to listen to what he's saying," or "I should at least look like I'm taking in what he is saying."

2. Students share their responses.

3. The instructor hands out, "Guidelines To Negotiating Conflict".

4. The instructor/students read the handout aloud, or the students read it silently.

5. The students may add to this list of negotiating guidelines.

6. In pairs students write down an example to illustrate one of the guidelines. They can use examples from their lives, from the media, or from the lives of other people. For example: "The other day my mom and brother were arguing about money. Then he started telling her that she shouldn't be dating Jerry, because he was too old for her. They didn't separate other issues from the conflict at hand."

7. Each pair shares one of their examples with the class.

 

ACTIVITY SEVEN (GN 1)

Objective: Students will understand a specific overall approach to handling conflict.

1. Students individually write down a conflict they recently experienced in their lives.

2. The instructor passes out the "Steps To Resolving Conflict" handout.

3. Students read the handout.

4. The instructor asks the students to put the steps into their own words.

5. Students write about their conflict in response to each of the five steps. They write down what they did or wish they had done at each of the steps.

 

ACTIVITY EIGHT (GN 1)

Objective: Students will be able to analyze a conflict scenario to see how well the people follow good negotiation guidelines.

1. The instructor passes out the handout, "Ethics and Business."

2. The students read the conflict, and answer the questions.

3. The students review the "Guidelines To Negotiating Conflict" handout.

4. The students share their answers in small group and also assess how well the roommates did in terms of meeting each of the five guidelines.

 

GN3 Negotiate an issue

ACTIVITY ONE (GN 3)

Objective: Students will be able to role play a workplace situation demonstrating successful negotiation.

1. In pairs student write down 2-3 conflict scenarios related to the workplace.

2. Students call out the conflicts and they are all written on the board. For example: "You always have to work weekends, because the boss favors your co-worker."

3. Students choose one scenario and create a role-play.

4. The instructor passes out the "Negotiation Role Play Rating Sheet."

5. Students present their role-play in front of the class.

6. The audience fills out the rating sheet following each role-play.

7. Students study the feedback they received, present another role-play and are again are assessed on their ability to negotiate.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (GN 3)

Objective: Students will be able to successfully demonstrate how to negotiate for something that they want at work.

1. The instructor writes the word "promotion" on the board. Students discuss what it means and what forms it can take.

2. Students share a time with the class when they were promoted or else asked for a promotion or something else that they wanted at work.

3. Students in pairs or small groups brainstorm a 3-5 step approach to asking for a raise.

4. Students read the handout, "How To Ask For What You Want"

5. In pairs, students role-play asking for a raise, or something else that they want. One person is the employee and the other person is the boss. Then, the roles are reversed.

6. Students self-assess themselves using the "Promotion Role-play Assessment" form.

7. Students share their assessments with their partners, and/or with the class as a whole.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (GN 3)

Objective: Students will be able to share their knowledge of conflict resolution and negotiation with others (make a video).

1. Students brainstorm all of the things that they now know about conflict resolution: the concept of conflict, strategies for managing conflict and tips to negotiating a situation.

2. Students decide in groups or as a class the exact information that they would like to present in a video.

3. The students decide how they would like to present the information: demonstration, drama, and/or panel discussion.

4. Students make the video and then show the video to an audience.

 

TEAMWORK (GT)

GT1 Understand the concept of teamwork, courtesy and cooperation

ACTIVITY ONE (GT 1)

Objective: Students will be able to define "teamwork".

1. Read the following aloud to the students: "When he was on his death bed, Mori Motonari, a Japanese warlord, called for his three children. He gave each of them an arrow to break. Each child could easily break the arrow. He then tied together the three arrows and asked each child to try to break them. Each child tried to break the bound arrows but without success. Individually an arrow was easy to break, but when they were bound together they were impossible to break. That lesson was not forgotten by Mori's children, and certainly not by the rest of Japan."

2. Students are asked the meaning of the story. (They should come up with the idea of teamwork.)

3. The instructor writes the word "teamwork" on the board and the class creates a definition. They can do so by brainstorming words on the board. They can also use the dictionary to assist in generating more words. They decide on a definition they are happy with.

4. The students write the definition in their notebook, and rate themselves on a scale of 1-10 (10 being the highest) on how comfortable they feel working in teams.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (GT 1)

Objective: Students will be able to identify situations in their lives where they were part of a team.

1. Students read their definition of teamwork.

2. The instructor cites examples from his/her life of working as a member of a team.

3. Some students share experiences they had working on teams.

4. The instructor writes them on the board.

5. In small groups, students make a list of the benefits and difficulties of working on a team.

6. Students write a paragraph in order to discuss the benefits or difficulties of working on a team. They may wish to use one of the following topic sentences in order to assist them in getting started: "I enjoy working on teams," or "Working on teams can be frustrating." Students include specific examples from their lives in order to support their topic sentence.

7. Students read each other's writing and offer feedback.

 

GT2 Identify and assess their roles in a team and norms or rules of behavior that contribute to a team's effectiveness

ACTIVITY ONE (GT 2)

Objective: Students will understand what factors are necessary in creating a team.

1. Students get into groups of four to six.

2. Each group is given a box of plastic straws, thirty pipe cleaners and thirty paperclips.

3. Students are instructed to work together and design a structure to be displayed somewhere in public. The theme of the structure is "Our Community." Each group has one hour in which to complete the structure.

4. After one hour all of the structures are placed in front of the class. Each group explains the significance of their structure.

5. After every group has discussed its structure, students are asked: What had to happen in order for all of you to work together effectively?

6. The instructor passes out the handout, "Successful Teams ".

7. Students read through the handout and assess whether their group was successful in meeting those criteria.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (GT 2)

Objectives: Students will be able to identify typical roles people take on when they are part of a team.

1. The instructor asks the class to reflect on the process they went through in activity one in order to create their structure. S/he then asks, "When you are part of a team, what role do you usually take? Are you usually a leader? Are you usually quiet? Do you support the person who seems to hold the power and dislike the person who doesn't?" Students respond.

2. The instructor passes out the handout, "What Is Your Teamwork Style?"

3. Students read through the handout.

4. Students do a self-assessment based on the information in the handout. They divide a piece of paper into three sections. In one section they write down those skills that they already possess; in another, those they would like to improve on; and, in the third, those skills that they aren't interested in working on.

5. Students share their assessment results with one another.

 

ACTIVITY THREE (GT 2)

Objective: Students will reassess the roles they take on teams after experiencing teamwork.

1. Students are reminded of the structure they created in activity one. They are asked to describe the skills they used. They are told that now they will participate in a problem solving activity which requires different kinds of skills.

2. Students get into groups of four to six, and are each handed out a copy of the "Country Puzzle."

3. Students read the instructions and in their groups proceed to figure out the answer.

4. After a group comes up with the solution, they share that solution with the rest of the class.

5. Students revisit their "What is your Teamwork Style?" assessment forms and again assess themselves; this time based on the problem solving activity they have just completed.

 

ACTIVITY FOUR (GT 2)

Objective: Students will identify poor teamwork behavior.

1. The instructor tells a story about someone s/he had a difficult time working with. Students share examples of people they had a hard time working with.

2. The instructor directs students to get into pairs or groups of three, look at their "What Is Your Teamwork Style?" assessment form and their "Successful Teams" form and to create a list of poor teamwork attitudes.

3. Groups write out the poor behaviors on pieces of paper, one behavior per paper.

4. Everyone goes to the wall or to the board and sticks up their papers . Without talking, students move papers into clusters of similar attitudes.

5. The class decides on labels for each cluster.

6. Students discuss causes of poor teamwork attitudes.

7. In pairs, students create role-plays where one person has a poor attitude and the other person talks to him/her about it.

 

ACTIVITY FIVE (GT 2)

Objective: Students will understand the steps people typically go through when they form teams.

1. Students brainstorm what people go through when they try to get to know each other at a party or on the job (using sequence: first, second, third).

2. The instructor writes down what they say.

3. Students are told that people go through a similar experience when they form teams in the work place.

4. Students read the handout, "The Stages of Group Development".

5. Students set aside the reading and get into pairs or groups of three.

6. Students see if they can recall the stages of group development.

7. Students share how they will use any of the information they've learned about being a team player and group development in their lives.

 

ACTIVITY SIX (GT 2)

Objective: Students will be able to discuss positive and negative team behavior.

1. Students get into groups of four to six.

2. Students are instructed to create an assessment titled, "Are You A Team Player?" They are given the following instructions:

  "Create a quiz for people to take in order to figure out how well they are able to work on teams. Use the information you've already learned about team work. The quiz should include both positive and negative teamwork behavior statements or questions. It will look like the quizzes that you have seen in magazines. People generally score quizzes, so you will need to develop a scoring system. At the end of the quiz create a key so people can find out what their score means. The quiz you create will be used by other students."

3. The instructor gives students examples of the various quiz formats they can use: Do you feel comfortable listening to others...yes/no. How well do you listen to others...on a scale of 1-10. Would you rather listen to others or give orders...choice.

4. After students create their quizzes, the instructor goes over each group's quiz with them to check for comprehensibility. Students will likely need to edit their quizzes.

5. The quizzes are typed up and given to others.

 

GT3 Identify issues around team leadership including leader and follower styles

ACTIVITY ONE (GT 3)

Objective: Students will be able to identify different traits leaders and followers possess, and to describe their own traits.

1. Students are asked, "Do you see yourself more as a leader or a follower?" and why.

2. The board has a line going across it. On one end the word "leader" is written. On the other end the word "follower" is written. Students stand up and write their names somewhere along this continuum.

3. In small groups students brainstorm words that remind them of the word "leader" and words that remind them of the word "follower."

4. The instructor writes definitions of each word from the dictionary on the board.

5. Students write a paragraph relating themselves to one of those definition, using examples and some of the vocabulary they brainstormed.

 

ACTIVITY TWO (GT 3)

Objective: Students will assess their leadership skills.

1. Students are told that all of them possess leadership qualities of some sort.

2. Students assess their leadership skills, using the "Leadership Self-Assessment" form.

3. Students write down at least two areas they feel confident in on a piece of paper and under each one write down an example which illustrates their ability.

4. Students take turns standing up in front of the class and responding to the question, "Do you have any leadership ability?"

 

ACTIVITY THREE (GT 3)

Objective: Students will identify issues around being a leader and being a follower.

1. On one side of a piece of paper, students list the benefits of being a leader and on the other side they list the benefits of being a follower.

2. Students call out the benefits of being a leader and the benefits of being a follower and they are written on the board. (Leave part of the board clean for step three.)

3. Students call out the difficulties of each role and they are written on the board.

4. The program director or other community leader comes in, looks at what is written on the board, offers comment and explains what s/he likes about his/her leadership role.

5. A secretary or support person of some kind comes in, looks at what is written on the board, offers comment and explains what s/he likes about his/her follower role.

6. Students share which role they would feel most comfortable playing and why.

 

ACTIVITY FOUR (GT 3)

Objective: Students will document their effectiveness and flexibility as a team member.

1. Students look through all of the work they have done and develop a list describing traits of effective and flexible team members.

2. Students write about how they have demonstrated effectiveness and flexibility as a member of a team.

3. Students write about how they have used the information they have learned in class outside of the classroom and how they hope to use it in the future.

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